Tag Archives: mindful

Find Inner Peace in the Midst of Chaos

It is very important to be in tune and mindful of the one activity you spend the majority of your adult life doing… Work. As a lot of the days activities may have negative connotations (too much to do with too little time, naggy coworkers, daunting tasks), there is a way to bring peace throughout a chaotic day…

Below are 12 tips that The Zen Buddhist master Thich Nhat Hanh, who is credited with being the father of mindfulness in the West, has developed to ensure not only that we stay in balance but also are able to see our work in the context of creating a better world:

  • Start your day with 10 minutes of sitting in meditation.

 

  • Take the time to sit down and enjoy eating breakfast at home.

 

  • Remind yourself every day of your gratitude for being alive and having 24 brand-new hours to live.

 

  • Try not to divide your time into “my time” and “work.” All time can be your own time if you stay in the present moment and keep in touch with what’s happening in your body and mind. There’s no reason why your time at work should be any less pleasant than your time anywhere else.

 

  • Resist the urge to make calls on your cell phone while on your way to and from work, or on your way to appointments. Allow yourself this time to just be with yourself, with nature and with the world around you.

 

  • Arrange a breathing area at work where you can go to calm down, stop and have a rest. Take regular breathing breaks to come back to your body and to bring your thoughts back to the present.

 

  • At lunchtime, eat only your food and not your fears or worries. Don’t eat lunch at your desk. Change environments. Go for a walk.

 

  • Make a ritual out of drinking your tea. Stop work and look deeply into your tea to see everything that went into making it: the clouds and the rain, the tea plantations and the workers harvesting the tea.

 

  • Before going to a meeting, visualize someone very peaceful, mindful and skillful being with you. Take refuge in this person to help stay calm and peaceful.
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  • If you feel anger or irritation, refrain from saying or doing anything straight away. Come back to your breathing and follow your in- and out-breath until you’ve calmed down.

 

  • Practice looking at your boss, your superiors, your colleagues or your subordinates as your allies and not as your enemies. Recognize that working collaboratively brings more satisfaction and joy than working alone. Know that the success and happiness of everyone is your own success.

 

  • At the end of the day, keep a journal of all the good things that happened in your day. Water your seeds of joy and gratitude regularly so they can grow.

 


 

Original Source:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/practical-ways-to-find-your-zen-at-work_568aa168e4b014efe0dafc4e?utm_hp_ref=business

 

This Type of ‘Thinking’ Will Enhance Your Life in All Aspects

A strategic way of thinking called, “Design Thinking”, has helped various successful entrepreneurs and engineers innovate many successful products that enrich the business world today. But this way of thinking can also benefit one outside of the business world as well:

Bernard Roth, a prominent Stanford engineering professor, says that design thinking can help everyone form the kind of lifelong habits that solve problems, achieve goals and help make our lives better.

“We are all capable of reinvention,” says Dr. Roth, a founder of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford and author of the book, “The Achievement Habit.”

I’ve applied design thinking to my own life the past few months, and it seems to be working. I’ve lost 25 pounds, reconnected with close friends and refocused my energy on specific goals and habits.

Design thinking has helped me identify the obstacles that were stopping me from achieving my goals, and it’s helped me reframe my problems to make them easier to solve.

In the words of Dr. Roth, design thinking helped me “get unstuck.”

To get started, design thinkers focus on five steps, but the first two are the most important.

Step 1 is to “empathize” —

learn what the real issues are that need to be solved.

Next, “define the problem” —

a surprisingly tough task.

The third step is to “ideate” —

brainstorm, make lists, write down ideas and generate possible solutions.

Step 4 is to build a prototype or create a plan.

The final step is to test the idea and seek feedback from others.

Design thinking is normally applied by people who are trying to create a new product or solve a social problem or meet a consumer need.

For instance, Stanford students went to Myanmar to work on an irrigation project. The first two steps of design thinking — empathize and define the problem — meant that the students spent time with the farmers to understand their problems with watering crops.

In doing so, they discovered that the farmers’ real problem was not irrigation but light. The farmers used candles or kerosene lanterns, and the fumes filled their small huts. Managing their needs for light without electric power consumed a great deal of time and income.

As a result, the design-thinking students used empathy to shift their focus to the actual problem that needed solving. They developed affordable, solar-powered LED task lights. They have since provided millions of lights to 42 countries, creating an affordable lighting solution in parts of the world that don’t have electricity, or have spotty service.

Dr. Roth says the same type of thinking that solved the lighting problem for the poor farmers can be applied inward. To start, think about the problem you want to solve. Then ask yourself, “What would it do for me if I solved this problem?”

“Design thinking on the highest level is a way of reframing the way you look at the world and deal with issues, and the main thing is this idea of empathy,” Dr. Roth says. “If you have tried something and it hasn’t worked, then you’re working on the wrong problem.”


Read more from this article at:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/01/04/design-thinking-for-a-better-you/?ref=health

Exclusive Insight From The Mindful Gurus Themselves

These kids who have benefited from social-emotional learning from a charter school in Mar Vista, California have more of a grasp on what’s going on inside their mind than most adults do. Whether your brain feels like a jar of glitter being shaken up or you find a peaceful place and take deep breaths, we could all take a few notes from these mindfulness gurus themselves in the video, “Just Breathe” by Julie Bayer Salzman & Josh Salzman (Wavecrest Films)

 

4 Essential Tips To Become Highly Inuitive

We all get that ‘gut feeling’ that tells you to either take that leap of faith, or to hold off, that something isn’t quite right. The intuit feeling is so unexplainable, but yet so understandable and it is a natural gift that will always be present, whether you’re in touch with it or not. Learn to maximize this gift by exploring habits from the highly intuitive from, Sophy Burnham, bestselling author of The Art of Intuition:

  1. They listen to their inner voice 

“It’s very easy to dismiss intuition,” says Burnham. “But it’s a great gift that needs to be noticed. ” The No. 1 thing that distinguishes intuitive people is that they listen to, rather than ignore, the guidance of their intuitions and gut feelings.

“Everybody is connected to their intuition, but some people don’t pay attention to it as intuition,” Burnham say. “I have yet to meet a successful businessman that didn’t say, ‘I don’t know why I did that, it was just a hunch.'”

In order to make our best decisions, we need a balance of intuition — which serves to bridge the gap between instinct and reasoning — and rational thinking, according to Francis Cholle, author of The Intuitive Compass. But the cultural bias against following one’s instinct or intuition often leads to disregarding our hunches — to our own detriment. “We don’t have to reject scientific logic in order to benefit from instinct,” says Cholle. “We can honor and call upon all of these tools, and we can seek balance.  And by seeking this balance we will finally bring all of the resources of our brain into action.”

 2. They take time for solitude 

pictureguy
pictureguy

If you want to get in touch with your intuition, a little time alone may be the most effective way. Just as solitude can help give rise to creative thinking, it can also help us connect to our deepest inner wisdom.

Intuitive people are often introverted, according to Burnham. But whether you’re an introvert or not, taking time for solitude can help you engage in deeper thought and reconnect with yourself.

“You have to be able to have a little bit of solitude; a little bit of silence,” she says. “In the middle of craziness … you can’t recognize [intuition] above all of the noise of everyday life.”

     3.  They create 

“Creativity does its best work when it functions intuitively,” writes researcher and author Carla Woolf.

In fact, creative people are highly intuitive, explains Burnham, and just as you can increase your creativity through practice, you can boost your intuition. In fact, practicing one may build up the other.

4. They practice mindfulness

Meditation and other mindfulness practices can be an excellent way to tap into your intuition. As the Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute explains, “Mindfulness can help you filter out mental chatter, weigh your options objectively, tune into your intuition and ultimately make a decision that you can stand behind completely.”

Mindfulness can also connect you to your intuition by boosting self-knowledge.A 2013 study published in the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science showed that mindfulness — defined as “paying attention to one’s current experience in a non-judgmental way” — may help us to better understand our own personalities. “ “


Original Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/19/the-habits-of-highly-intu_n_4958778.html