Tag Archives: finance

Becoming $1,000 Richer in Just 5 Tips

What may seem to be a minuscule purchase at the time, could be burning a hole in your pocket, and often times it goes overlooked. Establishing best practices can save you $1,000 in a week if executed consistently and honestly, who couldn’t use an extra $1,000 around, am I right? Rammit Smith, author of, “I Will Teach You To Be Rich” provides these important tips when it comes to saving:

1)Optimize Your Cell Phone Bill

When buying a new cell phone, Sethi likes to pay a little bit more upfront by choosing the unlimited data and text messaging plan. He then sets a three-month check-in on his calendar, and analyzes his spending patterns after a few months to see where he can cut back.

-Estimated Savings: $20- $600

2) Create a No Spending Day Once a Week

Choose one day each week and challenge yourself to not spend a single dollar.The key to this tip is putting it in your calendar so it becomes a consistent system.

Estimated Savings: $5-$75

3) Postpone a Large Purchase Until Next Month

Set a reminder on your phone to remind you about the desired purchase and most likely you will either realize you don’t need the object anymore or it may even be on sale now.

Estimated Savings: $50-$3,000

 

4) Go Cash Only

Take a limited amount of cash out of your checking account that will last for a few weeks. This habit will force you to become a conscious spender.

Estimated Savings: $50-$300

 

5) Forget The Bar Scene- Ask Your Friends To Your House

Copyright:ridofranz
Copyright:ridofranz

 

Even if this is only done once or twice a month, it is one of the most cost effective decisions according to Sethi. This factors out costs such as, gas, food, drinks, tips, taxicab, valet, etc.

Estimated Savings: $50-$200

 


 

 

Read The Rest of Sethi’s Tips at:  http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-save-money-quickly-2015-6?op=1#ixzz3dZ6lfNV0

How To Handle Your Money From a New Job

After countless interviews, patiently waiting, and anxiously negotiating, you finally landed that new job! Many of us get caught up in the emotions of success and satisfactory emotions after the acceptance, but there is one more factor to analyze; how this transition will affect your finances. Thankfully, experts have established what to do with your money when you start your new job:

1. Make sure you understand your new compensation package.

Job seekers tend to focus just on salary, says Cameron Laker, CEO and cofounder of human resources and recruitment firm Mindfield. But before you start your new job, you should sit down and review all the ways in which your finances will be changing.

2. Adjust your budget.

If you’re taking a lower-paying job to join an exciting new startup or follow your passion, you’ll need to carefully consider how you’re going to scale back. If you’re going to be making more money, you’ll have to plan ahead in order to avoid lifestyle creep.

3. Decide what to do with your former workplace’s 401(k).

If your former employer offered a 401(k) plan to save for retirement, you’ll have several options: keeping it as-is, rolling it over (industry jargon for moving it) into your new 401(k), or rolling it into an IRA.

For most people, he says, rolling over retirement accounts into an IRA is “the path of least resistance.” Usually, it will offer lower-cost investments than their new 401(k).

4. Change over your insurance.

In many cases, you won’t be able to start using your new health insurance plan until you’ve worked at the company for thirty days. During the transition period, you’ll want to enroll in COBRA to keep your old coverage going, Oliver says. That can be expensive, since you’ll be taking over the costs that were once covered by your employer, but it’s still worth the peace of mind that comes from knowing that you’re prepared in case of emergency.

Once you’ve given your notice, your company has 14 days to give you the option to receive COBRA coverage. If you say yes, your coverage will begin on the day after your benefits would normally end.

5. Understand how vesting works.

Does your new employer offer vesting that will allow you to earn equity over time? If so, you’ll want to figure out exactly how that works. Generally, companies will grant you options from the start, but they only become yours as they vest over time. Likewise, you may be given stock, but the company will retain the right to repurchase it if you leave, unless it has fully vested.


Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/what-to-do-with-your-money-when-you-change-jobs-2015-7#ixzz3fo9v559c

A Quick Beginner’s Guide To Finance and Savings

Mortgage rates, 401(k), IRA, credit scores, yikes! So many questions with so many scenarios. Even with a college degree, these concepts that force us into adulthood can seem puzzling. THANK GOODNESS for Mathew Zeitlin, Buzzfeed News Reporter, for simplifying these concepts and giving advice for grabbing adulthood by the horns!

 

 

What is the difference between a 401(k) and an IRA? Is one better than the other?

The main difference between a 401(k) and an IRA is who administers it. Your employer can run a 401(k) plan that you choose to sign up for, while an IRA is managed individually.

With 401(k) plans, you can contribute up to $17,500 in pre-tax income to your 401(k) and your employer can match your contributions. This is as close to free money as you can get and is by far the best deal in personal finance. Income on a 401(k) is pre-tax, meaning that for what you contribute up to the limit, your income for tax purposes goes down.

IRAs, on the other hand, have nothing to do with your employer. You have to sign up for one yourself through a bank or brokerage. Traditional IRAs have a similar tax advantage to 401(k) plans, but a lower contribution limit ($5,500).

 

So, how exactly does a credit score work?

There are five main factors to your credit score.

1)The first is payment history, which is a record of whether or not you’re paying your debts on time.

2)The second largest component is how much you owe, or “credit utilization.” Large balances, at or near your credit limit, hurt your credit score.

3)The third is how long you’ve had credit.

4)There’s also what’s known as the credit mix, which accounts for only 10% of the score.

5)And finally there’s “new credit,” which is a little more vague, but it’s basically bad to open a bunch of different lines of credit in a short time period.


 

Original Source:http://www.buzzfeed.com/matthewzeitlin/what-every-millennial-needs-to-know-about-saving-and-finance#.es6xgWeVe