Tag Archives: exercise

Exercising This Muscle Will Prevent Further Injuries and Back Pain

Even if you are in excellent athletic shape and practice cardio every single day, you are still subject to that mysterious back pain, knee injuries, muscle tightness and dysfunctional hip movement… This exercise called , the glute bridge, will eliminate all of those dysfunctions and discomforts once you strengthen and continue to nurture the muscle. Read below to see how:

 

Level 1: Traditional Glute Bridge

Start on your back, with your feet on the floor close to your hips, with your arms at your side. Smoothly lift your hips so that your body is in a straight line from knees to chest. Pause at the top, squeezing your glutes. Then, lower slowly back to the floor. Perform 10 to 15 repetitions every day for two weeks or until you can perform 15 repetitions while meeting the checkpoints.

Level 2: One-Leg Glute Bridge

Start on your back, as if you were going to perform a Traditional Glute Bridge. Before you lift your hips, however, point one foot straight into the air. Keeping that leg elevated, perform a glute bridge while keeping your hips level. Perform 10 to 15 repetitions on each side every other day for two weeks or until you can smoothly perform 15 repetitions while meeting the checkpoints.

Level 3: Glute Bridge on Box

From a Traditional Glute Bridge position, put your feet up on a very secure “box,” which could be a sturdy box, a coffee table, or a chair (perhaps pushing the object against a wall so that it definitely will not move). Then, lift your hips so that your body is a straight line from knees to chest. Perform 10 to 15 repetitions every other day for two weeks or until you can perform 15 repetitions while meeting the checkpoints.

Level 4: One-Leg Glute Bridge on Box

Instead of keeping both feet on the box, keep one foot straight up in the air so that you are only performing the movement with one leg. Perform 10 to 15 repetitions on each side. Perform this modification three times per week for two weeks or until you can easily perform 15 repetitions while meeting the checkpoints.

Level 5: Hip Thrusts With Deficit

Find another stable box, short table, or chair in addition to the one that you are already using. If you need to, brace both boxes against walls or other sturdy surface, so that no sliding occurs.

Place your shoulders on one box and your feet on the other box. This will create a deficit, meaning that your hips will be able to drop below your shoulders. From this position, allow your hips to slowly move all the way to the floor, and then back up into a full bridge position. Perform 10 to 15 repetitions three times per week for two weeks or until you can perform 15 repetitions smoothly while meeting the checkpoints.

Level 6: Single-Leg Hip Thrusts With Deficit

This ultimate variation of the glute bridge requires extreme strength and control, so be sure that you are meeting the checkpoints for the other progressions before adding this move into your routine!

Again, place your shoulders on one box, and place your feet on another box. Then, lift one foot into the air and allow your hips to gently touch down to the floor. Keeping that foot and leg elevated, push your hips back up through the deficit space and into a full One-Leg Glute Bridge. Perform 10 to 15 repetitions on each side.


Original Source:

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-24611/the-one-muscle-everyone-should-train-every-day-and-how-to-do-it.html

How These Highly Successful People Stay In Great Physical Shape

Work can no longer be an excuse after you read through this blog and realize some of the most successful people in the world take daily measures to stay in shape! It’s easy to get caught up in the day to day grind of working, cooking and sleeping but it’s important for your mind that helps you stay successful to exercise. Take a look below to see some of the exercises these successful people do:

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump hits the links instead of the gym

Trump told Men’s Health magazine that, while playing golf might not seem like exercise, it helps him stay fit.

“When I play a few rounds on the weekend, I’ll come in Monday morning and I’ll have lost three or four pounds,” Trump said. “That’s very pleasurable exercise, and it keeps you away from the refrigerator because you’re out on the course.”

Media mogul Oprah Winfrey combines cardio and meditation to help her power through her busy days

One of the most powerful women in the world trains hard to keep herself physically healthy. In an interview with O Magazine, Winfrey’s trainer said her workouts include “45 minutes of cardio six mornings a week, four to five strength-training sessions a week, incline crunches, and stretching.”

Winfrey also admits to sitting in silence for 20 minutes, twice a day.

GoPro founder and CEO Nick Woodman shreds some waves

Woodman, who was once the highest-paid US chief executive, launched his sports-camera company thanks to his passion for surfing.

Not just an avid surfer, Woodman is a noted adrenaline junkie, snowboarder, and mountain biker.

Apple CEO Tim Cook is in the gym at 5 a.m. every morning

Cook is a self-described fitness nut, as Adam Lashinsky wrote in his profile of Cook forFortune.

He wakes up around 4:30 or 5 a.m. every day to get to the gym several times a week, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Mint.com founder Aaron Patzer lifts weights, runs, and climbs

“You cannot work, in this instance, 14-hour days without getting a good workout in as a break,” he told Life magazine. “The typical workday, particularly in startup mode, is from 9 to 6 or 9 to 7, then you take a two-hour break to work out and eat dinner. By that time you’re relaxed, and then you work until midnight or 1 a.m. If there was no break with physical activity, you’d be more tired and less alert.”

His workouts include lifting, running, rock-climbing, and even tree-climbing.

“Whenever I see a tree that is climbable, it must be climbed,” he said. “Sometimes when I’m on a run, I’ll just run up a tree, jump on a branch, and swing off. My favorite tree, in Saratoga, gets me a good 75 feet up.”

FOCUS Brands group president Kat Cole strikes a pose no matter where she is

Cole, who runs the parent company of brands like Auntie Anne’s, Carvel, and Cinnabon, has an “on the road” routine and an “at home” one, both of which incorporate early morning yoga.

As early as 5:30 a.m., Cole will do yoga and exercises in her hotel room, the gym, or at home, for 30 minutes, she said in a Business Insider article.

 


Original Source:

http://www.businessinsider.com/exercise-routines-of-highly-successful-people-2016-4

The EASY Move To Eliminate Back Pain & Strengthen Your Core

Unfortunately, back pain is a common discomfort these days. There’s the stress on the body from sitting at a desk all day, stress tension from everyday life and  funky fad workouts going around that could injure the back, and as this move alone may seem funky and make you feel a bit silly, I guarantee it will loosen you up (yes, you can laugh at yourself doing it), strengthen your core over time and relieve back pain once and for all! Watch the video below from, Dr. Brianne Grogan, DPT is a women’s health physical therapist, fitness expert and learn the move:

“I am trained as a women’s health physical therapist, but you won’t find me in the clinic taking clients through sets of traditional rehabilitative exercises; rather, you’ll find me shouting from the rooftops about the glories of hip circles, the one (fun!) move that can help you achieve a more flexible body that’s free from pain.

Hip circles (and other forms of multi-planar movement) build core strength and flexibility in a quick, enjoyable way. They get you out of the rut of straight-plane, linear movement and activate muscles that are rarely used in modern life. Hip circles can relieve back pain, tone the core, loosen up tight hips, and spice up your fitness routine if it’s feeling a little flat. They’re safe, effective, and anyone can do them—no coordination, no special equipment, and no significant amount of space is required.”

 


Original Source:

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-24586/the-one-fun-move-that-nixes-back-pain-improves-core-strength.html

3 Ways You Can Learn To Love Running

Running may be the most dreaded form of working out/warming up for a lot of people. It can be difficult to master and a miserable process, but it is also one of the healthiest ways to get in shape and maintain your shape. If you hate running, then check out these 3 tips below from Amanda C. Brooks, an eight-time marathon finisher, running coach and ultra passionate runner, to help you learn to love it:

1. Start walking.

When you are starting out, always walk before you run. Literally warm up to every run with at least a half mile of walking. Then take walk breaks while you run to allow you to spend more time running. Over time, you’ll decrease the breaks but always keep the warm-up.

2. Slow down.

Stop trying to go so far or so fast on day one … or day 30 for that matter! When you find you can’t breathe, slow down. When you find you just can’t break a distance barrier, slow down. When running sounds like something awful to do, slow down. Eventually this all leads to speeding up, but you need a base first.

3. Join a running group.

Many people are afraid to join a running group because they might be the slowest person there. As someone who has moved a lot and tested out a lot of groups, I can tell you there are always walkers, there are always superstars, and everyone is welcoming.

If you happen upon an unfriendly group, high-tail it out of there and find another group. Nothing will keep you showing up for runs like having friends or even acquaintances who expect you to be there.


 

Read more tips from the original source here:

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-23935/how-to-actually-start-a-running-habiteven-if-you-hate-cardio.html

Overcome Your Depression With This Exercise

Exercising releases endorphins, endorphins make you happy and happiness overcomes sadness! But there is definitely more to the equation when it comes to overcoming depression. Luckily, in a recent study, a fun exercise that incorporates a social scene has been linked to fighting the blues:

Bouldering provides a physical challenge for your body.

Bouldering gets you moving in an organic way and offers a full-body workout. For those who don’t like traditional exercise such as timed increments on a treadmill, bouldering is great because it’s reminiscent of playing on a playground. You simply have to climb from point A to B, and anyone can start attempting the easiest routes.

Bouldering stimulates the mind.

What sets bouldering apart from other sports is the mental aspect — it requires a significant amount of focus, concentration, and coordination. It’s been described to me countless times by many different people as a “moving meditation,” because when you’re climbing a wall, you can’t really focus on much else. It gives people a fun avenue to really tune into themselves and to be present.

Bouldering fosters a strong sense of community.

The most unique aspect of bouldering is the social aspect. While you’re on your own in the movement, you are constantly surrounded by others who are encouraging you to reach your goal. Bouldering fosters a strong sense of community and is similar to group therapy in that participants are encouraged to cheer each other on and help to solve problems on the wall.

Positive social interaction is invaluable, and due to the inherent nature of bouldering, it provides plenty. Bouldering simultaneously allows you to break barriers physically and mentally, which can really transform how a person views themselves. It opens up a world of possibility, so the next time you’re feeling a little blue, give bouldering a shot.

 


 

Original Source:

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-23631/this-form-of-exercise-might-help-you-beat-depression.html