Category Archives: Body

Two Ten Minute Workouts to Melt Fat Fast!

If you can spare ten minutes, you’ve got plenty of time in your busy day to complete these two workouts that are catered to you from Fitness expert holly Perkins. She has developed these workouts with some upbeat jams synced to each workout. We provided the workout and tunes, you bring on the pump. Time to rock out that workout!

For an Upper Body Workout:tenmin2

For a lower body workout:tenmin1


 

Original Source: http://www.buzzfeed.com/sallytamarkin/5-three-song-workouts

 

You Can Now Afford Healthy Eating Thanks to This…

It’s a common assumption that having a healthy diet often comes with a pricey grocery list, but believe it or not, there are ways to beat the price tag when your grocery shopping for healthy foods; you just have to know what to look for. Whether you are a business owner with a busy day or a high performance athlete, everyone has a budget and everyone needs a healthy diet to keep them rocking throughout their day. Thanks to registered and licensed dietitian at Urban Nutrition, Nicole Chase, and nutritionist and author of “The One One One Diet,” Rania Batayneh, we have 5 of your next grocery list items:

Sweet Potatoes

You can find this versatile veggie for $.50 apiece at Trader Joe’s.

Photo:Wally Hartshorn
Photo:Wally Hartshorn

While one serving contains about 40 grams of carbs, there’s no need to feel bad about consuming carbs if they’re coming from sweet potatoes, Batayneh tells us. “They provide your muscles and brain with energy, as well as a host of other nutrients to keep your body running smoothly. High in fiber, they help maintain healthy blood sugars. They also contain beta-carotene, a precursor for vitamin A.”

 

 

Dried Beans

Beans are often overlooked, but they’re a great economical ingredient to add to your grocery list.

“A serving of beans — about ½ to ¾ cup — offers eight grams each of muscle-building protein and satiating fiber, making them a healthy and economical add-on at breakfast, lunch, or dinner,” says Batayneh. “Dried beans are cheaper than canned beans but require advance planning, as they generally require soaking for a couple hours.”

Chase agrees that buying dried beans in bulk is the least costly option, and recommends using them as the base for meatless meals.

Eggs

“At around $.20 per egg, eggs are one of the most economical (and environmentally friendly!) sources of protein,” says Batayneh.

“Both the whites and the yolk are valuable sources of nutrients: The whites offer six grams of high quality protein, while the yolk provides choline, a B vitamin that plays a role in brain and liver health, as well as zeaxanthin and lutein, two antioxidants that boost eye health.”

What’s more, egg preparation options are endless. Try them scrambled, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, poached, or whip up an omelet or frittata.

Jicama

If you’re looking to munch without loading up on hundreds of calories from chips, crackers, or other crunchy snacks, jicama is your answer.

“Ditch the chips and try sliced jicama, a non-starchy vegetable with a crispy, juicy flesh,” says Chase. “Jicama is a tuber vegetable that can be found in the produce section of your local grocery store. With only 25 calories per half cup, sliced jicama packs in 20% of the daily value for vitamin C and is a good source of fiber.”

Chase recommends peeling and slicing the veggie to use in place of chips as a dipper for appetizers.

Canned Tuna

“The American Heart Association recommends consuming at least two servings of fatty fish per week, but for the time- or money-conscious, that can be difficult,” Batayneh tells us. “Canned tuna (or salmon) removes both of those obstacles.”

Cans of Tuna isolated against a blue background
© kitchbain

You can find two-serving cans for about $.70 each, and they’re rich in omega-3 fatty acids, she says. “Omega-3 fatty acids improve heart health by reducing blood triglyceride levels and slowing the growth of atherosclerotic plaques. Their consumption is also correlated with a reduced risk of depression.”

 

 

 


 

To view more affordable, healthy grocery items, read more here: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-healthiest-cheapest-foods-2015-7

Hack: Defeat Your Worst Enemy- Dehydration

Get this: our bodies are made of 50% water and two of our vital organs needed to survive (our brain and heart) are made up of 73% water. So the statistic that 7% of Americans drink NO water in their day, should literally make you get up out of your chair and grab a glass for their sake.

Full-on dehydration occurs when you lose more fluid than you take in, and your body lacks the water and other fluids necessary to carry out basic bodily functions. Symptoms of moderate dehydration include:

– Dry, sticky mouth

– Sleepiness

– Thirst

– Few or no tears when crying

– Dry skin

– Headache

– Constipation

– Dizziness

– Lightheadedness

– Extreme fussiness or sleepiness in infants and children

– Irritability and confusion in adults

– Very dry mouth, skin and mucous membranes

– Lack of sweating

– Little or no urination

– Sunken eyes

– Shriveled and dry skin that lacks elasticity and doesn’t bounce back when pinched into a fold

– In infants, sunken fontanels — the soft spots on the top of a baby’s head

– Low blood pressure

– Rapid heartbeat

– Rapid breathing

– Fever

– In the most serious cases, delirium or unconsciousness

Water for the active

For the physically active, water has added benefits. It prevents achiness, and it flushes toxins from the body. “Drink in advance of activity and during and after as well,” Cartwright said. “By the time thirst kicks in, you are dehydrated.”

What about sports drinks?

Cartwright is also an adjunct faculty member with the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Arizona. She often has to remind her college students that energy drinks and sports drinks are not the same thing. She recommends sports drinks that contain six percent glucose or less for endurance athletes as well as for people who live in extreme environments (such as college students walking all day in the Arizona heat) or anyone engaged in an activity that causes them to sweat profusely. Otherwise, water is preferable. Cartwright is leery of the smart water craze. “There’s no reason to buy smart waters,” she said. “It does have added vitamins, but for some people it makes them nauseous, and it doesn’t really do anything except cause them to spend more money.”


Learn More At: http://www.livestrong.com/article/1006640-thy-enemy-dehydration/

Exclusive Insight From The Mindful Gurus Themselves

These kids who have benefited from social-emotional learning from a charter school in Mar Vista, California have more of a grasp on what’s going on inside their mind than most adults do. Whether your brain feels like a jar of glitter being shaken up or you find a peaceful place and take deep breaths, we could all take a few notes from these mindfulness gurus themselves in the video, “Just Breathe” by Julie Bayer Salzman & Josh Salzman (Wavecrest Films)

 

How She Gave Up The Food That Slowly Kills

Can you rise to the challenge like food writer, Megan Kimble did? For one whole year, Kimble decided to steer clear of the processed food group (aka almost everything in stores now days), and provided insight of her journey through an interview done by, Kate Bratskier with The Huffington Post. Kimble documented her journey, the lessons she learned and the changes she made in her new book,  “Unprocessed: My City-Dwelling Year of Reclaiming Real Food“.

-What was your biggest challenge throughout the year?

Going out, for sure. There’s such a social aspect of food; so much of eating is being with friends and partaking in what others are partaking in. Forever, humans have bonded over the sharing of food. It’d be really hard to meet up with friends, where everyone would be having pizza. It was really hard to be professional and to go to work functions — you don’t want to talk about what you eat with everyone. That was definitely the hardest part.

-Did you drink any alcohol?

I drank beer and wine. I tried to drink only beers from breweries I could identify. For me, the premise for what I considered unprocessed was theoretically being able to make it at my house. I could have brewed wine or beer at home. I made mead at home. It’s basically the lowest-cost alcohol you can make on your own. Part of the bargain of this whole thing was figuring out how to not put my life on hold. I wanted to try my best to make sure the drinks weren’t processed, but also wanted to be able to connect with people.

-Did you have any slip-ups during the course of the year?

Of course. I was a single when I started the year and then wanted to start dating. I went out with this guy who sort of ordered food for us in this really macho, annoying way and then food came and I didn’t know what to do. It was a sushi roll. White rice is processed, but I decided to make an exception. I immediately regretted it, especially because later in the date I found out that the guy didn’t believe that global warming was a real thing. I write about food and the environment so that’s kind of a deal breaker. What are you gonna do? When you eat out, it’s so hard to know what’s in your food. I’d ask so many questions, but at some point you have to move on and hope for the best.

-What was the first thing you ate when your year was up?

A Sonoran hot dog and a Diet Coke. The Diet Coke tasted terrible after a year without soda. It tasted like straight chemicals. Actually, I’ve totally kicked the soda habit — it just doesn’t taste good to me anymore. I used to eat more snack foods, like packaged cookies, chips and stuff like that. Now that snack food genre stuff doesn’t make me feel good or keep me full. That was a nice sort of side effect of the year — a lot of these processed foods are still kind of invisible to me and my cravings.


 

Read more from the interview at the original source at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/24/quit-processed-food-megan-kimble-a-year-without_n_7648276.html?utm_hp_ref=healthy-living&ir=Healthy+Living

 

4 Essential Tips To Become Highly Inuitive

We all get that ‘gut feeling’ that tells you to either take that leap of faith, or to hold off, that something isn’t quite right. The intuit feeling is so unexplainable, but yet so understandable and it is a natural gift that will always be present, whether you’re in touch with it or not. Learn to maximize this gift by exploring habits from the highly intuitive from, Sophy Burnham, bestselling author of The Art of Intuition:

  1. They listen to their inner voice 

“It’s very easy to dismiss intuition,” says Burnham. “But it’s a great gift that needs to be noticed. ” The No. 1 thing that distinguishes intuitive people is that they listen to, rather than ignore, the guidance of their intuitions and gut feelings.

“Everybody is connected to their intuition, but some people don’t pay attention to it as intuition,” Burnham say. “I have yet to meet a successful businessman that didn’t say, ‘I don’t know why I did that, it was just a hunch.'”

In order to make our best decisions, we need a balance of intuition — which serves to bridge the gap between instinct and reasoning — and rational thinking, according to Francis Cholle, author of The Intuitive Compass. But the cultural bias against following one’s instinct or intuition often leads to disregarding our hunches — to our own detriment. “We don’t have to reject scientific logic in order to benefit from instinct,” says Cholle. “We can honor and call upon all of these tools, and we can seek balance.  And by seeking this balance we will finally bring all of the resources of our brain into action.”

 2. They take time for solitude 

pictureguy
pictureguy

If you want to get in touch with your intuition, a little time alone may be the most effective way. Just as solitude can help give rise to creative thinking, it can also help us connect to our deepest inner wisdom.

Intuitive people are often introverted, according to Burnham. But whether you’re an introvert or not, taking time for solitude can help you engage in deeper thought and reconnect with yourself.

“You have to be able to have a little bit of solitude; a little bit of silence,” she says. “In the middle of craziness … you can’t recognize [intuition] above all of the noise of everyday life.”

     3.  They create 

“Creativity does its best work when it functions intuitively,” writes researcher and author Carla Woolf.

In fact, creative people are highly intuitive, explains Burnham, and just as you can increase your creativity through practice, you can boost your intuition. In fact, practicing one may build up the other.

4. They practice mindfulness

Meditation and other mindfulness practices can be an excellent way to tap into your intuition. As the Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute explains, “Mindfulness can help you filter out mental chatter, weigh your options objectively, tune into your intuition and ultimately make a decision that you can stand behind completely.”

Mindfulness can also connect you to your intuition by boosting self-knowledge.A 2013 study published in the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science showed that mindfulness — defined as “paying attention to one’s current experience in a non-judgmental way” — may help us to better understand our own personalities. “ “


Original Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/19/the-habits-of-highly-intu_n_4958778.html