It’s a common assumption that having a healthy diet often comes with a pricey grocery list, but believe it or not, there are ways to beat the price tag when your grocery shopping for healthy foods; you just have to know what to look for. Whether you are a business owner with a busy day or a high performance athlete, everyone has a budget and everyone needs a healthy diet to keep them rocking throughout their day. Thanks to registered and licensed dietitian at Urban Nutrition, Nicole Chase, and nutritionist and author of “The One One One Diet,” Rania Batayneh, we have 5 of your next grocery list items:

Sweet Potatoes

You can find this versatile veggie for $.50 apiece at Trader Joe’s.

While one serving contains about 40 grams of carbs, there’s no need to feel bad about consuming carbs if they’re coming from sweet potatoes, Batayneh tells us. “They provide your muscles and brain with energy, as well as a host of other nutrients to keep your body running smoothly. High in fiber, they help maintain healthy blood sugars. They also contain beta-carotene, a precursor for vitamin A.”

 

 

Dried Beans

Beans are often overlooked, but they’re a great economical ingredient to add to your grocery list.

“A serving of beans — about ½ to ¾ cup — offers eight grams each of muscle-building protein and satiating fiber, making them a healthy and economical add-on at breakfast, lunch, or dinner,” says Batayneh. “Dried beans are cheaper than canned beans but require advance planning, as they generally require soaking for a couple hours.”

Chase agrees that buying dried beans in bulk is the least costly option, and recommends using them as the base for meatless meals.

Eggs

“At around $.20 per egg, eggs are one of the most economical (and environmentally friendly!) sources of protein,” says Batayneh.

“Both the whites and the yolk are valuable sources of nutrients: The whites offer six grams of high quality protein, while the yolk provides choline, a B vitamin that plays a role in brain and liver health, as well as zeaxanthin and lutein, two antioxidants that boost eye health.”

What’s more, egg preparation options are endless. Try them scrambled, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, poached, or whip up an omelet or frittata.

Jicama

If you’re looking to munch without loading up on hundreds of calories from chips, crackers, or other crunchy snacks, jicama is your answer.

“Ditch the chips and try sliced jicama, a non-starchy vegetable with a crispy, juicy flesh,” says Chase. “Jicama is a tuber vegetable that can be found in the produce section of your local grocery store. With only 25 calories per half cup, sliced jicama packs in 20% of the daily value for vitamin C and is a good source of fiber.”

Chase recommends peeling and slicing the veggie to use in place of chips as a dipper for appetizers.

Canned Tuna

“The American Heart Association recommends consuming at least two servings of fatty fish per week, but for the time- or money-conscious, that can be difficult,” Batayneh tells us. “Canned tuna (or salmon) removes both of those obstacles.”

You can find two-serving cans for about $.70 each, and they’re rich in omega-3 fatty acids, she says. “Omega-3 fatty acids improve heart health by reducing blood triglyceride levels and slowing the growth of atherosclerotic plaques. Their consumption is also correlated with a reduced risk of depression.”

 

 

 


 

To view more affordable, healthy grocery items, read more here: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-healthiest-cheapest-foods-2015-7

About The Author

Texas raised with southern ways, transplanted into a San Diego, California daze! I have an itch for adventure and an undeniable want for leaps of faith! Looking for inspiration in each and every day and sharing a few Happy Healthy Wealthy Life Hacks I’ve found along the way :)

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Marketing Ninja-
The Ultimate Game of Life

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